Seaweed Chip Deliciousness

Following on from my recent post, I thought it only appropriate to share with you one of my favorite seaweed snacks at the moment – Ocean’s Halo Seaweed Chip. I personally LOVE the taste, and the crunch, but I am also very impressed by how nutrient rich these little chips are. Tasty and healthy! I can’t really ask for more. Try them out (if you haven’t already), and let me know what you favorite flavor is. I like a few flavors depending on what I am in the mood for. So far the front-runners are chili lime, sea salt, and hot & spicy. Oh and I just discovered you can get $1 off, so be sure to use the coupon!

And I’m out,
Peace sign
Ida

What to do when you see weed

No, not the plant kind ;) I mean the sea kind! So, usually when I see seaweed, I buy and eat it, but I recently discovered disturbing ingredients in mainstream seaweed salad, which sparked my interest. Unfortunately, these ingredients make their way into other sushi dishes as well. This a big bummer…

I really like seaweed. It has whole host of benefits. I personally like the taste, but I also like that it makes my belly feel better, and provides me with a big punch of calcium. I hardly eat any dairy, so this is a big benefit for me. I feel cleansed and balanced, which is due to its toxic fighting and neutralizing properties.

So, here is the bad news. Mainstream seaweed salad (and other sushi ingredients), have several chemicals and additives, most notably food dyes. In the case of seaweed salad, you will find blue #1 (which has caused brain cancer in lab animals), and yellow #5 (which has the strongest link to severe allergic reactions). Furthermore, food dyes have been linked to numerous social and behavioral disorders in children and adolescents.

So what you thought was healthy, may not be. You can tell by simply looking at the food. Is it very bright green? Almost neon looking? Turns out, many restaurants and stores order their seaweed salad (and other products) in bulk from distribution companies who then deliver it pre-made. You can read about scary sushi ingredients here. I suppose I should have known there was food coloring, but I didn’t think about it until I read the back of the container.

Speaking of, this is a great example of how companies strategically call-out benefits on the front of packaging, while minimizing more harmful facts on the back (or bottom, or side).

So will I continue to eat seaweed salad and sushi? Yes, but I am going to be extra careful about where I eat and where I buy from. I would recommend asking the restaurant or store about the ingredients in their sushi.

And I’m out,
Peace sign
Ida

Trust in the Good, Trust in the Bad

I have a slight modification to my recent post on cultivating trust in one’s life. One of my best friends emailed me after reading my post, and told me she liked the post, and that she was trying to cultivate gratitude in her life. So, I wrote her back, and said, “Well why don’t you turn it into a gratitude box instead? Just write down things you are thankful for and slip it into the box.” She emailed me back and said “Okay, I will.”

Shortly after, I went through something kind of upsetting, and once it was over, I reminded myself to trust that all would be okay and to let it go, AND unexpectedly I also felt thankful. I was happy because of the immense support I had during the incident. So, I took out a piece of paper, and wrote “I am thankful for my friend, and her unconditional love, support and understanding,” and slipped it into my trust box.

When it comes to trust, I believe we need to trust in the good and the bad that happens in our lives. Often we fixate too much on the bad, and too little on the good, but it is unfair to give so much of our attention and energy towards the bad incidences. There is so much good that comes our way, and recognizing and appreciating that good is just as (if not more) important as letting go of or moving on from the bad.

SO, I would like to revise my trust box directions slightly, and suggest that you also use the box to practice gratitude. I started doing this, and have found that in times of strife, when I can also see the good, it helps boost my mood, calm my worries, and of course build my trust muscle even more! Also, it reminds me to be appreciative of all the good that I have in my life, which I admittedly tend to forget.

Here’s how it works:

  • On a small piece of paper, write down something good that happened recently or in the past, or something you are thankful for.
  • Then, fold the paper up, and put it into your trust box. Practice the act of identifying the good in your life, and appreciating the positive things that come your way.
  • Every day take time to write it down 1-3 things that went well, and put into the box to help build your trust muscle and to energize yourself.

And I’m out,
Peace sign
Ida

How To Cultivate Trust in Your Life

trust_fall

If you are anything like me, you struggle with trusting people. I hadn’t really realized this until now, but my lack of trust in people has developed into a lack of trust in the universe. Uh oh, this is not good, especially because I constantly preach that everything happens for a reason. Yes, I do strongly believe this to be true, but I suppose I have forgotten to remind myself more often to trust that the universe has got my back. To remember that when things go wrong, I am simply getting rerouted into the right path. When times are good this is of course much easier to do, but when times are bad that pessimistic voice enters the mind. So it is time to take action…or try to. Join me?

If you can’t already tell I don’t like uncertainty, and I love to have control over situations J But of course this is not realistic, and ultimately results in feelings of worry, anxiety, stress, and perhaps depression. So, I was listening to a lecture the other day, and I loved the idea of creating a “Trust” Box. Say whaaat?

Okay, here is how it works:

  • On a small piece of paper, write down something you want or that you’re concerned about.
  • Then, fold the paper up, and put it into your trust box. Practice the act of turning it over to the universe and releasing the need to control.
  • Every time you have a desire, concern or worry, write it down and put into the box to help build your trust muscle and to calm yourself.

This also works great for worrywarts, another lovely characteristic I possess. For some, there may be several papers to fold up and throw in the box in the beginning. That is okay. The point is you are practicing the act of building trust and letting go. Will it work? I don’t know, but I am on Day 3, and it seems to be helping. It feels good to write down my worries, and turn it over to the universe.

Now, let’s not go crazy here and start handing everything over. No, your laundry will not wash itself. But, there are some things, we can only put our best effort into doing, and trust that the ultimately things will unfold as they should.

You can use a shoebox, a small gift box, or whatever you desire. Place the box somewhere special and visible (as a cue and reminder for yourself). Decorate it, keep it plane, do whatever your heart desires. It’s your box. Now get to writing and start building your trust muscle. Here’s hoping the tactic works for you and for me.

And I’m out,
Peace sign
Ida

Could death from drug resistance be solved through food?

I was browsing through twitter last weekend, and saw the headline “Drug resistance deadlier than cancer by 2050.” I thought I would read something about how our dependence on drugs may not be quite as dependable as we thought. So, this is sort of true.

The resistance in the article pertains specifically to antimicrobial drugs, which help to fight off infections such as strains of E. coli, malaria, and tuberculosis to name a few. However, antibiotics are also used as part of many medical treatments, like hip replacements, Caesarean sections, and chemotherapy. Drug resistance is estimated to have caused about 700,000 deaths this year, and at this rate would cause 10 million by 2050. Yikes!

Not sure what actions will be taken, but I have a potential solution. How about the rice diet? Joking slightly, but I actually learned about a Japanese man (George Ohsawa) that fought off both tuberculosis and malaria through rice and diet. Some of you may have heard of Ohsawa and macrobiotics, the diet he pioneered. No, I am NOT recommending we all start following the macrobiotic diet. My point is that the answer could and likely does lie in what we eat, including where it’s sourced and how it’s processed.

2050 is quite a ways away, so I hope we come up with some good solutions to this deadly issue fairly soon. In the meantime, you can take matters into your own hands and keep your immune system strong by eating smart.

And I’m out,
Peace sign
Ida

Is Stevia Safe?

A co-worker just asked me this question, and my answer was “Yes, if it is 100% stevia from the whole leaf plant, otherwise, I’m not so sure.” I shared this link with her, and thought I’d share with all of you as well.

Basically, to be safe, look for “whole leaf stevia” AND NOTHING ELSE in the ingredient list when it comes to buying this sweetener. Oh and also, careful when it comes to products sweetened with stevia…you want to be sure those products adhere to the same rules.

Have a sweeeeet day :)

And I’m out,
Peace sign
Ida