Seaweed Chip Deliciousness

Following on from my recent post, I thought it only appropriate to share with you one of my favorite seaweed snacks at the moment – Ocean’s Halo Seaweed Chip. I personally LOVE the taste, and the crunch, but I am also very impressed by how nutrient rich these little chips are. Tasty and healthy! I can’t really ask for more. Try them out (if you haven’t already), and let me know what you favorite flavor is. I like a few flavors depending on what I am in the mood for. So far the front-runners are chili lime, sea salt, and hot & spicy. Oh and I just discovered you can get $1 off, so be sure to use the coupon!

And I’m out,
Peace sign
Ida

What to do when you see weed

No, not the plant kind 😉 I mean the sea kind! So, usually when I see seaweed, I buy and eat it, but I recently discovered disturbing ingredients in mainstream seaweed salad, which sparked my interest. Unfortunately, these ingredients make their way into other sushi dishes as well. This a big bummer…

I really like seaweed. It has whole host of benefits. I personally like the taste, but I also like that it makes my belly feel better, and provides me with a big punch of calcium. I hardly eat any dairy, so this is a big benefit for me. I feel cleansed and balanced, which is due to its toxic fighting and neutralizing properties.

So, here is the bad news. Mainstream seaweed salad (and other sushi ingredients), have several chemicals and additives, most notably food dyes. In the case of seaweed salad, you will find blue #1 (which has caused brain cancer in lab animals), and yellow #5 (which has the strongest link to severe allergic reactions). Furthermore, food dyes have been linked to numerous social and behavioral disorders in children and adolescents.

So what you thought was healthy, may not be. You can tell by simply looking at the food. Is it very bright green? Almost neon looking? Turns out, many restaurants and stores order their seaweed salad (and other products) in bulk from distribution companies who then deliver it pre-made. You can read about scary sushi ingredients here. I suppose I should have known there was food coloring, but I didn’t think about it until I read the back of the container.

Speaking of, this is a great example of how companies strategically call-out benefits on the front of packaging, while minimizing more harmful facts on the back (or bottom, or side).

So will I continue to eat seaweed salad and sushi? Yes, but I am going to be extra careful about where I eat and where I buy from. I would recommend asking the restaurant or store about the ingredients in their sushi.

And I’m out,
Peace sign
Ida

Trust in the Good, Trust in the Bad

I have a slight modification to my recent post on cultivating trust in one’s life. One of my best friends emailed me after reading my post, and told me she liked the post, and that she was trying to cultivate gratitude in her life. So, I wrote her back, and said, “Well why don’t you turn it into a gratitude box instead? Just write down things you are thankful for and slip it into the box.” She emailed me back and said “Okay, I will.”

Shortly after, I went through something kind of upsetting, and once it was over, I reminded myself to trust that all would be okay and to let it go, AND unexpectedly I also felt thankful. I was happy because of the immense support I had during the incident. So, I took out a piece of paper, and wrote “I am thankful for my friend, and her unconditional love, support and understanding,” and slipped it into my trust box.

When it comes to trust, I believe we need to trust in the good and the bad that happens in our lives. Often we fixate too much on the bad, and too little on the good, but it is unfair to give so much of our attention and energy towards the bad incidences. There is so much good that comes our way, and recognizing and appreciating that good is just as (if not more) important as letting go of or moving on from the bad.

SO, I would like to revise my trust box directions slightly, and suggest that you also use the box to practice gratitude. I started doing this, and have found that in times of strife, when I can also see the good, it helps boost my mood, calm my worries, and of course build my trust muscle even more! Also, it reminds me to be appreciative of all the good that I have in my life, which I admittedly tend to forget.

Here’s how it works:

  • On a small piece of paper, write down something good that happened recently or in the past, or something you are thankful for.
  • Then, fold the paper up, and put it into your trust box. Practice the act of identifying the good in your life, and appreciating the positive things that come your way.
  • Every day take time to write it down 1-3 things that went well, and put into the box to help build your trust muscle and to energize yourself.

And I’m out,
Peace sign
Ida