Got a bun in the oven?

No I’m not expecting, but I have a few close friends that are, so I wanted to share some information I learned through my coursework at Institute for Integrative Nutrition (IIN).

There is so much pregnancy information out there, and I can’t even begin to identify what the best, better or perfect book, author, or advice is. But, I can tell you that I really enjoyed what I learned from Nina Planck, food writer and farmer’s market entrepreneur. During one of my course modules, Nina, spoke for a few minutes about foods for pregnancy. I made sure to take good notes, as I figured they might come in handy at some point, and here we are!

My class notes are here, but of course these are only a summary. For far more details, I recommend reading her book, Real Food for Mother and Baby: The Fertility Diet, Eating For Two, and Baby’s First Foods. The fundamental premise of the book is sound: pregnant women’s diet should consist of mainly whole, unprocessed food. In fact, I think we can all agree that replacing the words “pregnant women” with any other word that describes the human species (and perhaps other species) would also hold true here.

If you want to get to know Nina a bit better, learn more about her food philosophy, and hear some of her advice and insights on food and fertility you can watch this video or read the transcript (it’s included on the site). Watch from minute 30:17 to 38:00 for pregnancy specific information.

Interestingly (although not surprising), while I was doing some research on what and how to eat while pregnant, I found a lot of the recommendations are the same as those provided for healthy eating. These include (and this is by no means comprehensive):

  • Drink plenty of fluids, primarily water
  • Incorporate ginger in the diet to subdue nausea and ease digestion
  • Drink 30 minutes before and/or after eating, as opposed to with food
  • Eat small meals throughout the day
  • Stick to vegetables, fruits and lean meats
  • Get plenty of omega-3s
  • Don’t over drink or overeat
  • Minimize heavy, greasy foods
  • Trust your stomach; not what others tell you works for them, as you may find certain habits work well for you & that you crave something that your body (and in this case, your baby) needs

And I’m out,

Peace sign
Ida

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